Saturday, May 28, 2011

Why Socialism - 2 -Albert Einstein

Man is, at one and the same time, a solitary beingand a social being. As a solitary being, he attemptsto protect his own existence and that of thosewho are closest to him, to satisfy his personal desires,and to develop his innate abilities. As a social being, he seeks to gain the recognition and affection of his fellow human beings, to share in their pleasures, to comfort themin their sorrows, and to improve their conditions of life. Only the existence of these varied, frequently conflicting, strivings accounts for the special character of a man, and their specific combination determines the extent to which an individual can achieve an inner equilibrium and can contribute to the well-being of society. It is quite possible that the relative strength of these two drives is, in the main, fixed by inheritance. But the personality that finally emerges is largely formed by the environment in which a man happens to find himself during his development, by the structure of the society in which he grows up, by the tradition of that society, and by its appraisal of particular types of behavior. The abstract concept “society” means tothe individual human being the sum total of his direct and indirect relations to his contemporaries and to all the people of earlier generations. The individualis able to think, feel, strive,and work by himself; but he depends so much upon society—in his physical, intellectual, and emotionalexistence—that it is impossible to think of him,or to understand him, outside the framework of society. It is “society” which provides man with food, clothing, a home, thetools of work, language, the forms of thought, and most of the content of thought; his life is made possible through the labor and the accomplishments of the many millions past and present who are all hidden behind the small word “society.”
It is evident, therefore, that the dependence of the individual upon societyis a fact of nature which cannot be abolished—just as in the case of ants and bees. However, while the whole life process of ants and bees is fixed down to the smallest detail by rigid,hereditary instincts, the social pattern and interrelationships of human beings are very variable and susceptible tochange. Memory, the capacity to make new combinations, the gift of oral communication have made possible developments among human being which are not dictated by biological necessities. Such developments manifest themselves in traditions, institutions, and organizations; in literature; in scientific and engineering accomplishments; in worksof art. This explains how it happens that, in a certain sense, man can influence his life through his own conduct, and that in this process conscious thinking and wanting can play a part.
Man acquires at birth, through heredity, a biological constitution which we must consider fixed and unalterable, including the natural urgeswhich are characteristic of the human species. In addition, during his lifetime, he acquires a cultural constitution whichhe adopts from society through communication and through many other types of influences. It is this cultural constitution which, with the passage oftime, is subject to change and which determines to avery large extent the relationship between the individual and society. Modern anthropology has taught us, through comparative investigation of so-called primitive cultures, that the social behavior of human beings may differ greatly, depending upon prevailingcultural patterns and the types of organization which predominate in society. It is on this that those who are striving to improve the lot of man may ground their hopes: human beings are not condemned, because of their biological constitution, to annihilate each other or to be at the mercy of a cruel, self-inflicted fate.
If we ask ourselves how the structure of society and the cultural attitude ofman should be changed in order to make human life as satisfying as possible, we should constantly be conscious of the fact that there are certain conditions which we are unable to modify. As mentioned before, the biological nature of man is,for all practical purposes, not subject to change. Furthermore, technologicaland demographic developments of the last few centuries have createdconditions which are here to stay. In relatively densely settled populations with the goods which are indispensable to their continued existence, an extreme division of labor and a highly-centralized productive apparatus are absolutely necessary. The time—which, looking back, seems so idyllic—is gone forever when individuals or relatively small groups could be completely self-sufficient. It is only a slight exaggeration to say that mankind constitutes even now a planetary community of production and consumption.
I have now reached the point where I may indicatebriefly what to me constitutes the essence of the crisis of our time. It concerns the relationship of the individual to society.

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